Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)

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Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)

Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)

Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)

Seasonal influenza is an acute respiratory infection caused by influenza viruses which circulate in all parts of the world. There are 3 types of seasonal influenza viruses, types A, B, and C. Influenza type A viruses are further classified into subtypes according to the combinations of 2 different proteins, the haemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N), located on the surface of the virus. The subtypes of influenza A viruses currently circulating among humans are influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) subtypes. 

Key facts

  • Seasonal influenza is an acute viral infection that spreads easily from person to person.
  • Seasonal influenza viruses circulate worldwide and can affect people in any age group.
  • In temperate climates, seasonal epidemics occur mainly during winter while in tropical regions, influenza seasonality is less obvious and epidemics can occur throughout the year.
  • Seasonal influenza is a serious public health problem that causes severe illness and death in high risk populations.
  • An influenza epidemic can take an economic toll through lost workforce productivity and strained health services.
  • Influenza vaccination is the most effective way to prevent disease.
  • Antiviral drugs are available for treatment, though influenza viruses can develop resistance to the drugs.

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION 

Influenza Symptoms

Influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

* It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever.

CDC

Who is at risk?

Yearly influenza epidemics can seriously affect all populations, but the highest risk of complications occur among pregnant women, children aged 6–59 months, the elderly, individuals with specific chronic medical conditions such as HIV/AIDS, asthma, and chronic heart or lung diseases, and health-care workers.

Transmission

Seasonal influenza spreads easily, with rapid transmission in crowded areas including schools and nursing homes. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, droplets containing viruses (infectious droplets) are dispersed into the air and are spread to persons in close proximity who breathe these droplets in. The virus can also be spread by hands contaminated with influenza viruses. To prevent transmission, people should cover their mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing, and wash their hands regularly.

Prevention

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  • If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone for 24 hours without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the flu.

CDC

Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)- Pokhara Lekhnath Metropolitan City

Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)

Important Information: Influenza (Seasonal Flu)

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